NASA Juno Reveals Two Massive Storms in Latest Flyby of Jupiter

This picture of Jupiter’s violent southern side of the equator was caught by NASA’s Juno shuttle as it played out its latest close flyby of the gas monster planet on Dec. 21, 2018. NASA Juno Reveals Two Massive Storms in Latest Flyby of Jupiter.

This new point of view catches the eminent Great Red Spot, just as a huge tempest called Oval BA. The tempest achieved its present size when three littler spots impacted and converged in the year 2000. The Great Red Spot, which is about twice as wide as Oval BA, may have framed from a similar procedure hundreds of years prior.


NASA Juno Reveals Two Massive Storms in Latest Flyby of Jupiter

This picture of Jupiter's violent southern side of the equator was caught by NASA

Juno caught Oval BA in another picture prior on in the mission on Feb. 7, 2018. The violent locales around, and even the state of, the tempest have essentially changed from that point forward. Oval BA further changed lately, changing shading from rosy to an increasingly uniform white.

Juno took the three pictures used to deliver this shading upgraded see on Dec. 21, between 9:32 a.m. PST (12:32 p.m. EST) and 9:42 a.m. PST (12:42 p.m. EST). At the time the pictures were taken, the rocket was between around 23,800 miles (38,300 kilometers) to 34,500 miles (55,500 kilometers) from the planet’s cloud best above southern scopes spreading over 49.15 to 59.59 degrees.

Related : New Technique Reveals Missing Galactic Mergers

National researchers Gerald Eichstädt and Seán Doran made this picture utilizing information from the rocket’s JunoCam imager.

Source : scitechdaily

Image Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Gerald Eichstädt/Seán Doran





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